an Open Dances honoring legendary Women: Nina Simone

Honoring  Women’s History Month, we will be creating dance as part of the Open Dances series; drawing upon the iconic imagery within legendary artist Nina Simone’s  acclaimed song Four Women.

10995948_10153180427068573_372520825934980103_n

My skin is black
My arms are long
My hair is woolly
My back is strong
Strong enough to take the pain
inflicted again and again
What do they call me
My name is AUNT SARAH
My name is Aunt Sarah

My skin is yellow
My hair is long
Between two worlds
I do belong
My father was rich and white
He forced my mother late one night
What do they call me
My name is SAFFRONIA
My name is Saffronia

My skin is tan
My hair is fine
My hips invite you
my mouth like wine
Whose little girl am I?
Anyone who has money to buy
What do they call me
My name is SWEET THING
My name is Sweet Thing

My skin is brown
my manner is tough
I’ll kill the first mother I see
my life has been too rough
I’m awfully bitter these days
because my parents were slaves
What do they call me
My name is PEACHES

 

Open Dances will occur on the south side at Rebuild Foundation’s Dorchester Art + Housing Collaborative studio

Saturday, March 26th from 1pm – 3pm.

Open Dances is free and open to the public.  This event will be videotaped.

Dorchester Art + Housing Collaborative is wheelchair accessible. With respect to other participants, please refrain from wearing scented products. Real time Captioning (CART) will be provided.

This particular Open Dances is supported in part through Bodies of Work, 3Arts  and University of Illinois Chicago’s Department of Disability and Human Development Institute on Disability and Human Development.

 

 

 

Advertisements

meeting of creative minds.

seated l to r: Arna Bontemps, Paul Robeson, Canada Lee & Langston Hughes, 1946
seated left to right: Arna Bontemps, Paul Robeson, Canada Lee & Langston Hughes, circa 1946

Notes on the image: “Langston Hughes meets with Paul Robeson, Canada Lee, and Arna Bontemps about the Maxine Wood play, “On Whitman Avenue” in 1946. The play was about a Black World War II veteran who encountered racist opposition when he and his family moved into a White neighborhood. Mr. Lee produced and starred in the play which ran for 148 performances. This photo is from the Billy Rose Theatre Collection at the New York Public Library. Their record does not identify the gentleman on the left as Arna Bontemps (it simply says “Unidentified man”) but I am confident that it is indeed Mr. Hughes’s fellow poet and friend, Mr. Bontemps.” – #VintageBlackGlamour

#BlackIsBold #Collaboration #BlackHistoryMonth

Mr. Hughes, your roots flow infinite

your roots flow infinite

angels still sing your name

and here on earth

we carry your words in our hearts:

I’ve known rivers:
I’ve known rivers ancient as the world and older than the
     flow of human blood in human veins.

My soul has grown deep like the rivers.

I bathed in the Euphrates when dawns were young.
I built my hut near the Congo and it lulled me to sleep.
I looked upon the Nile and raised the pyramids above it.
I heard the singing of the Mississippi when Abe Lincoln 
     went down to New Orleans, and I’ve seen its muddy 
     bosom turn all golden in the sunset.

I’ve known rivers:
Ancient, dusky rivers.

My soul has grown deep like the rivers.
Langston Hughes
Happy B-day James Mercer Langston Hughes

 

#BlackIsBold #Roots #TheNegroSpeaksOfRivers #ForMrLangstonHughes

Water/Ocean parallel

Happenstance and parallel

Across the divide

Water, country, ocean, age

United by race

They share:

Late great aunt Christine –

We came from the water. And to the water We shall return.”

Canadian scholar & writer, Rinaldo Walcott –

I am indigenous to the oceans. My relationship is oceanic.

Living and passed

Both move the soul.

#BlackIsBold #Roots #WaterMovesTheSoul